At this place, on 14 June 1914, the Danish-minded Southern Jutlanders held their annual meeting in the open air. Here, around 10,000 people heard H. P. Hanssen’s moving speech in which he expressed his confidence in the survival of the Danish identity, even though the region had been under German rule for 50 years.

H. P. Hanssen also gave an unequivocal response to the German speeches that had been held at Dybbøl on 18 April 1914 at the celebrations to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the conquest of the Dybbøl Fortifications. He concluded with the following words:

We have the desire and the need for action. We have warmth and enthusiasm. We have a firm belief in the future of our people. And that is why we will respond to the jubilant victory celebrations of our adversaries by crying out the final verse of the poem that Jens Christian Hostrup wrote 50 years ago in defiance of the enemy:

So let the day’s events call forth your cheers
For the victory fate tossed you on a whim;
But doubt not you’re battling a thousand years
A battle you can surely never win!

This proved to be the last Danish annual meeting before the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914. The war ended with the defeat of Germany, which paved the way for a referendum and a repositioning of the border according to the principles of national self-determination. The memorial was set up in 1937.