Mind the wolf

Mind the wolf

Upper Silesia was an important plebiscite area. Before World War I, Germany had covered 20% of its weapons and ammunition requirements from here. This important industry formed part of the plebiscite campaign and is represented here by the smoking chimney in the little girl’s basket. She wears a red hood on her head and her […]

Save your child

Save your child

This exhortation to vote in the plebiscite on 11 July 1920 sends a message that cannot be misunderstood. The text is written in italics, and the motif shows how seriously the German side took this plebiscite concerning their future national affiliation. The white Polish eagle on a red background, which has been the national symbol […]

Don’t end up as cannon fodder

Don’t end up as cannon fodder

This very sombre plebiscite poster shows a skeleton in the red cape with a white fur border – the Polish national colours. In his right hand, the skeleton holds a bloody sword. Behind him we see a black horse with blood on its flanks and hooves. The text reads: ‘Poland needs you as cannon fodder!’, […]

Think of the native soil

Think of the native soil

Farmers were a motif used on posters in all plebiscite areas, and this was also the case in Allenstein and Marienwer­der. A farmer walking behind his harrow when working in the fields symbolises the close bonds between the people and their native soil. He stands in supplication, the palms of his hands turned towards heaven. […]

Appeal to German mothers

Appeal to German mothers

‘The Boy with the red Sweater’ was drawn by Paul Haase, who had earlier done ‘The Black Rider’ and ‘The Sower’. This poster, too, was printed in a large edition, and was undoubtedly meant to counter the Danish Poster, ‘Mother, vote Danish’. Looking straight ahead, the happy boy is holding a huge Schleswig-Holstein flag that […]

Vote German

Vote German

This poster was the most widely used on the German side. It has a very simple design, using the three Schleswig-Holstein colours with the word ‘German’ repeated in each colour. This poster was developed as the result of force majeure: at the end of 1919, it was rumoured that the International Commission aimed to forbid […]

We will harvest what we ourselves have sown

We will harvest what we ourselves have sown

One of the most popular German posters – designed by Paul Haase – shows a sower who asks his German countrymen the question, both rhetorical and exhortative, whether Denmark was to harvest the fruits of centuries of German work in Schleswig, if Zone 2 were lost? In this case, Haase quite deliberately chose the picture […]

Hold fast to the home soil

Hold fast to the home soil

This poster was made by Alex(ander) Eckener, a painter and graphic artist from Flensburg. Along with a poster by J. Holtz showing a rather gloomy version of the Schleswig coat of arms, this poster was used by the German side in Zone 2 in February and the beginning of March med 1920. The motif was […]

Uwe Jens Lornsen speaks

Uwe Jens Lornsen speaks

This German poster shows the head of Uwe Jens Lornsen encircled by a wreath of flame. This man was one of the pioneers of the Schleswig-Holstein movement, and in his work, ‘Über das Verfassungs­werk in Schleswigholstein’ (1830), he called for the separation of the Duchies of Schleswig and Holstein from the Kingdom of Denmark. It […]